Conlang
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Hello.

Ziē.

This Anyēa phrase is as meaningless as 'hello' does; people just use it to greet each other.

How are you?

Sheo-ǵa tsa?

Sheo -ǵa tsa
enjoying onself;

having a good time

subject is second person,

singular

marking a yes-no question

This literally translates into 'Are you having a good time?'. A bit rude in English it seems, but very okay in Anyēa.

Fine, thank you.

Sheo-nta ieli.

Sheo -nta ieli
enjoying onself;

having a good time

subject is first person,

singular

really,

honestly speaking

This literally translates into 'I am really having a good time'. In Anyēa there is no word for 'yes' or 'no', and people repeat the question more than in English they do.

May I please ask, what is your name?

Ci-nta pū-bin-ǵa-me tsa qie?

Ci -nta -bin -ǵa -me tsa qie
know subject is first person,

singular

name honoured,

dignified

second person,

singular

possessive case marks

yes-no question

once, one time

Literally, 'Can I know your dignified name just for once?'.

What is your name?

Dre-sie pū-ǵa-me?

Dre -sie -ǵa -me
what identical case marker

(this is a verb-like case;

so Lonya-sie serves as

the predicate)

name subject is second person,

singular

possessive case marker


My name is Lonya.

Lonya-sie-nta.

Lonya -sie -nta
personal name

(Literally, good and fragrant)

identical case marker

(this is a verb-like case;

so Lonya-sie serves as

the predicate)

subject is first person,

singular

This literally translates into 'I am Lonya'.

Nice to meet you.

H́ēn-ǵa-plhā shūn.

H́ēn -ǵa -plhā shūn
get to know second person, singular marks the object good, happy

This literally translates into 'It feels good getting to know you'.

Please.

Shēndo!

This is slightly stronger in emotion than 'please' in English.

Thank you.

Ābei.

This phrase is believed to have evolved from an ancient Anyēa term meaning 'I owe you'.

You're welcome.

Zāne-b́ea.

Zāne -b́ea
trouble, big affair little or no

This literally translates into 'no problem' or 'it's not a big thing'.

Excuse me. (getting attention)

Ai dzudza!

Ai dzudza
exclaimation here

This literally translates into 'Oi there!'. Simply saying 'dzudza' also carries the meaning of 'excuse me'.

Excuse me. (begging pardon or passing by)

Do-ǵa.

This literally translates into 'You are embarrassed'. A bit strange for English speakers, but this is how Anyēa works.

I'm sorry.

Ian-cü-nta.

Ian -cü -nta
to owe nothing to;

to have the right to face

not first person, singular

This literally translates into 'I don't have the right to face you'. The Anyēa word 'ian' is quite unique to the culture, and carries a meaning that the speaker has done nothing bad to the listener, and thus can face them with no shame.

It's okay.

Zāne-b́ea.

Note that this reply to 'I'm sorry' is identical to that of 'thank you'. It's not such a big thing, after all.

Goodbye.

Singie.

This carries the meaning of 'wishing for good'.

I can't speak Anyēa.

Kī-la-cü-nta Anyēa.

-la -cü -nta Anyēa
speak to be able to not I the Anyēa language

Do you speak English?

Kī-la-ǵa Ing-h́uo?

-la -ga Ing h́uo
speak to be able to you British language

Is there someone here who speaks English?

Ing-h́uo-kī-la-cia tsa?

This literally translates into 'Any English speaker?'.

Help!

Gāmen!

Gāmen means, well, 'help'.

Good morning!

Ziali!

This comes from the Anyēa for 'Hello suns', as there are two suns in Anyēa.

Good evening!

Singali!

This comes from 'Goodbye suns'.

Good night! (to sleep)

Ziē sūf-li.

'Hello dreams'.

I don't understand.

Tsu-cü-nta.

Where is the toilet?

Lho dzanū?

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