Conlang
Advertisement

Classification[]

Name: Marroc/Marroque

Type: Fusional

Alignment: Nominative-Accusative

Head Direction: Mixed

Number of genders: Yes

Declensions: Yes

Conjugations: Yes

Nouns declined
according to
Case Number
Definitiveness Gender
Verbs conjugated
according to
Voice Mood
Person Number
Tense Aspect

Moroccan (La Llengua d'Marroc, or simply Marroc/Marroque) is an Ibero-Romance language, directly descended from Old Spanish (with significant influence from Old Catalan) spoken by about 9 million people (or 26% of the population), mostly descended from Conquistadores who settled primarily in the northern and western coasts of the country. The indigenous Berber languages have left a sizeable impact on the language, and many Berber tribes adopted the tongue for themselves, to the point that a majority of Marroque speakers are ethnically Berber today.

The language is co-official with standardied Amazigh and Maghrib Arabic.

There is also a significant French influence, due to the French colonial presence, and the association with French words as modern, sophisticated, and Western. In modern times the influence of English is growing.

Phonology[]

Consonants

Bilabial Labio-Dental Dental Alveolar Post-Alveolar Palatal Velar Uvular
Nasal m [m] n [n]
Plosive p [p]

b [b]

t [t]

d [d]

c [k]

g [g]

Fricative f [f] c/z [θ]

d [ð]

s [s] ch [ʃ] g/j [x/χ]

rr [ʁ]

Approximant u [w] b/v [ʋ] i/y [j]
Trill r [r]
Flap r [ɾ]
Lateral l [l]
Lateral Fricative ll [ɬ]

Vowels

Front Central Back
Open i [i] / y [y] u [u]
Mid

e [e̞] / ue\eu [ø̞]

o [o̞]
Closed a [a]

Diphthongs

Rising Falling
a ua  ai/au
e - ei
i üi -
o - oi
ø üe uei/euy
y üy -

Orthography

Like all Romance languages, Moroccan (Marroc) uses /c/ where most languages prefer /k/. Before a front vowel, /c/ represents the [θ] phoneme. /z/ is used to represent this phoneme before a back vowel, to represent the phoneme [k] before a front vowel /qu/ is used. In a similar fashion, /g/ before a front vowel represents the [x/χ] phoneme, whereas /j/ represents this phoneme before a front vowel, and to represent [g] before a front vowel, /gu/ is used (note that gue is pronounced [gø])

The digraph /ch/ represents [ʃ], except in the trigraph /cht/, which is pronounced [xt] or [χt] (this only appears in Berber loanwords).

The letter /d/ usually represents the phoneme [d], except in intervocalic positions, where it almost always represents [ð]; /d/ also frequently represents this phoneme when immediately preceding or following a voiced liquid. For example, 'ordenador' (computer) may be pronounced /ordenaðor/ or /orðenaðor/.

The letter /h/ is always silent, and rarely used (except in a few common verbs).

The digraph /eu/ is pronounced [ø], and can also be spelled /ue/ (almost always in the combinations /que/ and /gue/, though /pue/ is common too). The diphthong /üe/ is pronounced [wø], and the diphthong [øi]/[øy] (allophony exists between them) can be spelled /eui/, /euy/, /uei/, or /uey/.

Amazigh Loanwords

l'Amasichta= Berber


l'avarruso= monkey

le cinere= desert 

la zada= palm (tree)

le zaine= date

l'aquidòn= tent

la zarralma= caravan

l'aljono= camel

l'iguide= dune

l'assedraro= mounain dweller

le lisèn= lion

la tafsa= trail

l'achevòn= rag/cloth

l'amda= oasis

l'aquella= pot/pottery

le quedràn= tar

la zàchol= pot

sfurrar= to cook (by steaming)

guemer= to hunt

nenguero= hunter

l'ilne= sorghum 

le cimse= barley 

Advertisement